Category: School in a Wheelchair

Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Helpful Tips for a Full and Accessible Childhood

spinal muscular atrophy

August is Spinal Muscular Atrophy Month and EZ-ACCESS is raising awareness about this devastating and debilitating disease. If your child lives with SMA, EZ-ACCESS is bringing you helpful tips for your child to live a full childhood.

Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by a mutation in a motor neuron gene 1. What does this mean? In a healthy person, this gene will normally produce protein that is critical to the functioning of the nerves that control our muscles. Without this protein, the nerves will eventually die leading to debilitating muscle weakness. 1 in 50 Americans is a genetic carrier.

Accessible playgrounds-

Accessible playgrounds are a new trend that is here to stay for children across the country. Nearly every state in the USA has an accessible playground, including Washington. Accessible playgrounds welcome children of all abilities and your children can play without restrictions that most playgrounds have for those in a wheelchair.

Home accessibility-

If an accessible playground is not anywhere near your home, there are still ways to entertain your child who lives with SMA. EZ-ACCESS has a variety of accessible ramps for the front, side and back doors of your home. The Pathway Modular Access System is ideal for your front door because of the sleek and easy to use ramp.  For the side door or into the garage area, a Transition Angled Entry Mat will assist the wheelchair user while going over the lip of a door. For the backdoor into the backyard or back patio, the Suitcase Singlefold AS Ramp is ideal so your child can enjoy the backyard with friends and family. This ramp is portable, so you can take it on vacations and errands.

Spinal muscular atrophy is a serious and debilitating muscle disease. EZ-ACCESS is here for all of your home accessibility needs, easily find an EZ-ACCESS ramp dealer here.

 

Ramps and Lifts for Schools: Making Back-to-School Season Accessible for All

school ramps

As back-to-school season is in full swing, it’s time for schools to consider ramps and lifts for children in wheelchairs. EZ-ACCESS has a variety of accessibility ramps and lifts to choose from for your school buildings. Today’s blog will highlight these ramps and lifts and why it’s important to have portable ramps if there are children in your school with a wheelchair.

Because of ADA guidelines, schools are required to have accessibility for wheelchair users. Even if your school may have accessibility options for children, some areas still may not be accessible because of the building being older and unable to have permanent accessibility ramps. EZ-ACCESS has portable and temporary solutions for your school building.

Titan Code Compliant Modular Access System– This fully complaint ramp is perfect for the front entrance of the school building. Many schools have seen an influx in students, so temporary classrooms in trailers are on campuses across the USA. The Modular Access System is ideal for these portable classrooms. These ramps are easily installed and easily disassembled.

Traverse Walk Ramp– This ramp option offers a safe and reliable option for young children to walk on or wheelchair users to move in and out of different classrooms and small sets of stairs. This smaller sized ramp is ideal for tight spaces and smaller school systems looking for a simple walking ramp.

Passport Vertical Platform Lift– A lift is ideal for moving to different levels of a building if an elevator is not within reach. A vertical platform lift is durable and ease to use for those who assist wheelchair users. It is approved and safe for school use because of the extensive testing done on the lift.

EZ-ACCESS hopes you are able to find the right ramp or lift for your school system. Find a local EZ-ACCESS Ramp dealer here.

Adjusting to School in a Wheelchair

school in a wheelchair
The kids have been in school for a few weeks now, and as they bring new books, backpacks and sports gear to school, some kids may be starting school with a different addition: a wheelchair. If your child isn’t used to navigating their school in their wheelchair, their day can be frustrating. EZ-ACCESS understands that transitioning to a new area in a wheelchair can be difficult. If your child is starting school in a new wheelchair, check out these tips for making the transition easier.
Weigh transportation options
Is it more effective to drive your child to school or rely on school/public transportation? If you need assistance getting your child into a vehicle, consider our portable ramp options. If your student takes the bus, schools will often be willing to send an aid to help them gather their things at the end of the day and get them on the bus safely.
Talk to your kids about how they should respond to questions
Your child is bound to be asked questions by other kids about why they’re in a wheelchair. Explain to them that other children are just curious and they should simply respond honestly to their questions. Assure them that there’s nothing to get defensive about and they should look at their wheelchair as a way to start conversations and meet new friends.
Encourage extracurricular activities
Some children in wheelchairs feel that they simply won’t be able to participate in certain school activities. Encourage your kids to ask about anything they’re interested in and see if they can take part in an adapted way. This is a great way for them to make friends and learn skills outside of the classroom.
Prepare for accessibility difficulties
Your school may be accessible when it comes to ramps and elevators, but what about other issues your student might face? It can be hard to reach books in lockers, reach food and utensils in the lunch line, carry a backpack, fit under desks and tables, get to class on time, or find time to visit the restroom between classes. Once your child has identified some issues they face at school, talk to the administration about how to remedy those issues if possible. Talk to your child’s teachers so they’re aware of these issues or tell your child to discuss these things with their teachers.
Equip them with the right accessories
To avoid balancing objects on their laps, set your child up with wheelchair bags and packs to hold their things. See if the school will allow your child to have a set of books at school and at home so they don’t have to travel with them. This is also a great time to help your child decorate their wheelchair so it expresses any new look they’re going for this school year.
The new school year can be a breeze if you simply talk to your child about any issues they’re facing and work with the school to fix them. If your child feels welcomed by their school and knows they can openly communicate issues, they’ll be more successful. Check in with your child to make sure their school year is off to a great start.