Monthly Archives: September 2014

Why You Should Consider a Vertical Platform Lift

passport vertical platform lift
Are you or a loved one a wheelchair or scooter user? If so, you understand the importance of accessibility that works for you. That’s why EZ-ACCESS offers portable ramps, modular ramps, commercial ramps and a vertical platform lift. Each option offers different benefits for users and caregivers.
Have you ever considered a vertical platform lift for your wheelchair or scooter? It could be perfect for you and your home! Read on to find out the benefits of installing a vertical platform lift at your home.
End the difficulty and discomfort of leaving your wheelchair
Stair lifts in your home are great for some wheelchair users or people who have difficulty with their stairs, but transferring yourself or being transferred from your wheelchair on to a lift can be stressful. With a lift like the Passport Vertical Platform Lift from EZ-ACCESS, you don’t have to leave your wheelchair to be transported up or down a level of stairs. It’s easier than ever to visit and enjoy your second story or a porch or deck outside!
Feel safe and confident as you are lifted
If you feel uncomfortable riding a stair lift, then the safety and stability features of the Passport Vertical Platform Lift will appeal to you. It features a safety rail for added stability on either side of the platform, as well as a gate with a mechanical interlocking latch with magnetic read switch that keeps riders protected and safe from accidents. It also prevents improper use of the lift.
Maintain your independence
With call/send control and a wireless remote control, you can get on and off of your Passport Vertical Platform Lift all by yourself. You won’t need help being transported to another chair and the easy operating system makes it a breeze to control.
If you think a platform lift would be perfect for you and your home, contact us to learn more. We would love to help make your home more accessible!

Wheelchair Etiquette for a Better World

wheelchair etiquette
If you’re accustomed to working with people who use wheelchairs, you probably have a good understanding of wheelchair etiquette. However, if you’re new to caring for, working with or living near a person in a wheelchair, you might not be sure how to act around them. EZ-ACCESS has experience working with a variety of disabled customers and their caregivers, and it can be frustrating for them when the people they interact with don’t have the best etiquette. Check out our list of wheelchair etiquette that can help make you a better person and caregiver and make your town more accessible to everyone who lives there. You might just find some ideas you’ve never considered before.

  • Don’t automatically hold on to or lean on someone’s wheelchair. If you’re good friends, it’s fine, but otherwise it can be distracting and uncomfortable.
  • Offer assistance, but don’t insist. They’ll say yes if they need help.
  • Always talk to the person in the wheelchair instead of a caregiver unless they are unable to talk.
  • If you can, sit down to share the same eye level when you’re talking.
  • Practice referring to people in a wheelchair as just that – “in a wheelchair”.
  • Don’t pity people in wheelchairs; talk to them about the cool things that come along with using a wheelchair.
  • Encourage your community to put curb cuts on all sidewalks. They’re inexpensive and help wheelchair users to be independent.
  • Write to your city to encourage the implementation of ramps at various city buildings and parks. Better yet, encourage the city council committees responsible for transportation, building and zoning to include members in wheelchairs or at least consult with people who use wheelchairs in your community. That way, all projects will be accessible to everyone.
  • Just be yourself. People in wheelchairs don’t expect special treatment, just fair treatment. Don’t be nervous about interacting with someone in a wheelchair.

We hope these tips help you feel more prepared to work with or help someone in a wheelchair in your community. Once you start thinking about the accessibility of people with varying levels of mobility, you start to see where you and your town could use improvement. If you’re looking for products to make your home or business more accessible, see what we have to offer here!

Not Your Average Ramp: What Makes the Pathway Modular Access System the Best

pathway modular access system
When you need improved accessibility to your home, you want it ASAP. You want the very best in safety and stability, but you might not be sure what to look for. You also want a reasonable price tag. Why not just have a family member or friend construct a wooden ramp for you? Why not go with a cheap option? While those ideas may seem convenient at the time, they won’t benefit you in the long run. EZ-ACCESS knows ramps. It’s what we spend all of our time engineering, constructing and installing. We know what our customers need and want in a ramp. And that’s why our Pathway Modular Access System is simply the best ramp option for your money. Let us show you why it’s not your average ramp:
You won’t have to settle for a bumpy ride off the ramp
In order to help you transition from the ramp to the ground with extra stability, we offer a standard ground transition, lower transition, landing pad, and transition plate connection with the Pathway Modular Access System. Depending on your needs and the setup of the ramp, we’ll find the best transition option for you.
Get customized handrails so you feel safe
The Pathway Modular Access System offers loops for handrail options. You can easily attach handrails together with our handrail connectors that require no additional fasteners or hardware. We want you to have the rails that are easiest for you to navigate and make you feel safe and secure on your ramp.
Don’t worry about fitting a ramp on your unique entryway
The Pathway Modular Access System has an angled platform that allows it to fit tight configurations. The ramp can fit multi-dimensional angles and takes up less space than most ramps. The low-profile, offset, oversized feet create extra stability and allow for multi-positional placement. You can also have stairs added for an additional entry option to your ramp and home.
Cut out maintenance with aluminum
Unlike wood ramps, aluminum requires little to no maintenance, won’t rust or rot, assembles with ease and minimal tools, doesn’t require a building permit, and can easily be expanded, reconfigured or moved to another location.
When you’re considering a ramp for your home, choose the option that offers you the most safety, customization and convenience.

Adjusting to School in a Wheelchair

school in a wheelchair
The kids have been in school for a few weeks now, and as they bring new books, backpacks and sports gear to school, some kids may be starting school with a different addition: a wheelchair. If your child isn’t used to navigating their school in their wheelchair, their day can be frustrating. EZ-ACCESS understands that transitioning to a new area in a wheelchair can be difficult. If your child is starting school in a new wheelchair, check out these tips for making the transition easier.
Weigh transportation options
Is it more effective to drive your child to school or rely on school/public transportation? If you need assistance getting your child into a vehicle, consider our portable ramp options. If your student takes the bus, schools will often be willing to send an aid to help them gather their things at the end of the day and get them on the bus safely.
Talk to your kids about how they should respond to questions
Your child is bound to be asked questions by other kids about why they’re in a wheelchair. Explain to them that other children are just curious and they should simply respond honestly to their questions. Assure them that there’s nothing to get defensive about and they should look at their wheelchair as a way to start conversations and meet new friends.
Encourage extracurricular activities
Some children in wheelchairs feel that they simply won’t be able to participate in certain school activities. Encourage your kids to ask about anything they’re interested in and see if they can take part in an adapted way. This is a great way for them to make friends and learn skills outside of the classroom.
Prepare for accessibility difficulties
Your school may be accessible when it comes to ramps and elevators, but what about other issues your student might face? It can be hard to reach books in lockers, reach food and utensils in the lunch line, carry a backpack, fit under desks and tables, get to class on time, or find time to visit the restroom between classes. Once your child has identified some issues they face at school, talk to the administration about how to remedy those issues if possible. Talk to your child’s teachers so they’re aware of these issues or tell your child to discuss these things with their teachers.
Equip them with the right accessories
To avoid balancing objects on their laps, set your child up with wheelchair bags and packs to hold their things. See if the school will allow your child to have a set of books at school and at home so they don’t have to travel with them. This is also a great time to help your child decorate their wheelchair so it expresses any new look they’re going for this school year.
The new school year can be a breeze if you simply talk to your child about any issues they’re facing and work with the school to fix them. If your child feels welcomed by their school and knows they can openly communicate issues, they’ll be more successful. Check in with your child to make sure their school year is off to a great start.